Electronic Records Management

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Price: $450.00 Date Published: December 25, 2013
Hours: 40.00 School: Kenvision Techniks Institute
Materials: Teacher: Solomon Kaminda
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Course Description

ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT & RECORDS MANAGEMENT

SYNOPSIS

The movement toward electronic records offers unprecedented opportunities to improve business efficiency via cheaper storage, faster information retrieval and automation of records management workflows such as retention and disposition. But with new opportunities come new challenges, as the technical and business reality of electronic records and systems meets records management requirements that existed well before terms like “electronic records” and “digitization” became commonplace in business.


It should also be noted that challenges of applying established requirements to new media are not unique to organizations that successfully moved away from physical record"keeping in favour of a paperless office.

Many organizations are subject to stringent internal administrative processes and external rules that require them to retain signed contracts, title documents and other core records in paper form. But the coexistence of paper and electronic content can add yet another layer of complexity to the otherwise simple tasks of identifying, retaining and eventually disposing of required business records.


So how does an organization reap the benefits of electronic records management while mitigating the compliance and practical risks introduced by those same electronic records?


The answer to this question is the core objective of this training.

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

DAY 1 THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES OF ELECTRONIC RECORDS


· What Are Electronic Records?
· Formats for Electronic Records
· The Multiplicity of Electronic Records
· Electronic Records as Evidence
· Benefits of Electronic Technologies
· Challenges of Electronic Records Management
· The Reality of Electronic Records
· Types of Information Systems
· The Nature of Electronic Information



DAY 2 TECHNOLOGICAL, LEGAL & ORGANIZATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT


· The Importance of Understanding Information Architectures
· Critical Information Technology Infrastructures
· E-Records and the Law
· Identifying E-Records-related Legislation
· Regulatory and Policy Issues
· Understanding Organisational Cultures



DAY 3 THE ROLE OF STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES


· The ISO and Standards
· Information Standards
· Functional Requirements for Record Keeping
· ISO 15489: Records Management Standard
· Digital Preservation: OAIS Reference Model
· International Archival Descriptive Standards
· Archival Codes of Ethics
· Applying Standards and Guidelines


DAY 4 THE IMPORTANCE OF METADATA


· What Is Metadata?
· Metadata and Records Management
· Developing Metadata Schema
· E-records & Taxonomy



CANNOT ATTEND? NOMINATE OR SUGGEST THIS EVENT TO A COLLEAGUE OR A FRIEND



Some F.A.Q to be addressed by the workshop:



ESTABLISHING AN ERMS IN YOUR ORGANISATION


What kind of technical equipment do we need to run e-records management systems?
What do we do when the system crashes?
What should our facility do to prepare for ERMS (Electronic Records Management System)?
What is in the future for ERMS?
How long do I have to keep electronic records?
Are electronic records legal in court?
Are digital images of paper records legal in court?
How should I go about hiring a consultant in records management?
Is electronic document imaging or scanning a good idea?
Why should organisations use sustainable formats for electronic records?
What does disposition mean?

RETENTION SCHEDULING /DISPOSITION


What is a records schedule?
What is an agency / department schedule?
What kind of storage media should I use?

E-RECORDS PRESERVATION CONCERNS


Do CDs/DVDs support different formats?
What is the shelf life of unrecorded CD-R/DVD-R discs?
How long can I expect my recorded CDs/DVDs to last?
What are my responsibilities in migrating media content and maintaining access to specific record formats over time?
What are the long-term access considerations for CDs/DVDs?
How do I know what electronic records are on each CD/DVD?
What procedures are appropriate for storing classified records on CDs/DVDs?
How should I handle CDs and DVDs?
What is the preferred method for labeling CDs/DVDs?
How do I store the discs to extend their useful life?
What is the preferred method for destroying CDs/DVDs?
How is information recorded onto optical media?
What issues are associated with the stability of optical media?
What is PDF/A-1?

HANDLING BORN-AGAIN / IMAGED/SCANNED RECORDS


What is imaging?
What factors must be considered in determining whether to image records?
What are possible advantages and disadvantages of maintaining records as images?
What are some of the cost factors that should be considered before starting an imaging project?
What are the recordkeeping requirements for imaged records?
When do records converted to images need to be scheduled?
Do indexes created for imaged records need to be scheduled?
What is a General Records Schedule?
How do I develop a records schedule?
When should I update the records schedule?
What are the benefits of using records schedules?
What is the records schedule review process?

E-RECORDS FILING ISSUES- BUSINESS CLASSIFICATION/METADATA ISSUES


What is a "records inventory"?
How do I inventory records?
What information should be included in an inventory?
What additional information should be included in an inventory of electronic records?
Who is responsible for records management?
What are some of the benefits of records management?
Can "sensitive" data be restricted?
Is government e-mail considered public record?
How should e-mail records be managed?
Does the public have the right of direct access to public record files?
After paper records are scanned into a digital imaging system, may the originals be destroyed?
I would like to preserve my department's website. What is the best way to do that?

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Course Materials

Around the world, individuals, organisations and governments have embraced information technologies. In 1977 there were fewer than 50,000 personal computers in use; as of 2002, over one billion computers had been shipped around the world. Over 40 percent of the computers in use world-wide are found in... Show More

Around the world, individuals, organisations and governments have embraced information technologies. In 1977 there were fewer than 50,000 personal computers in use; as of 2002, over one billion computers had been shipped around the world. Over 40 percent of the computers in use world-wide are found in the United States and 25 percent are in Europe. Nearly 20 percent of the world population has Internet access.

There are over two billion cell phones in use worldwide: 600 million in China alone, and, given the convergence of technologies, these phones are effectively extending the widening range of internet coverage. Whereas ten or fifteen years ago computer technologies were seen as tools used by governments and institutions in wealthier, more developed countries, today they are increasingly seen as essential resources in countries around the world.

The increasing prevalence of information technologies is a challenge to good government and accountable record keeping precisely because computers are seen as so important to business and daily life. Information technologies are considered by many to be ‘the solution’ to information management problems, and often computer equipment is installed in organisations with little consideration for what tasks they will perform and how the products of those actions – the records – will be managed.

Unlike computers, paper-based record-keeping technology is so familiar it can be hard to notice. Everyone working in a typical office environment recognises the nature and purpose of paper, typewriters, carbon paper for creating duplicates, pre-printed forms, filing cabinets, ledgers for entering accounts, warehouses for storing volumes of paper records and mail rooms for sending and receiving paper-based records. The paper records environment is easily understood even by people who have not worked in offices before.

Part of the challenge of moving from paper to electronic record keeping, therefore, is to understand the fundamental differences between the two technologies. In an electronic records environment, the stability of the record is at much greater risk. The reality is that it is not as easy to preserve an electronic record, as one can preserve a paper record by placing it in an acid-free folder and keeping it in a secure and environmentally sound storage facility.

When composing a letter, for instance, the writer takes a piece of paper, which may be pre-printed letterhead, and types or writes the content directly on the paper. When the letter is stored, its contents – the words on the page – and the medium – the paper with the letterhead on it – remain wholly intact. The paper medium is integral to the transmission and storage of the record. Retrieval is simple: someone just pulls the document out of the file in which it is stored and its content is immediately accessible to the human eye.

As will be explained in this module, an electronic record can consist of many different elements: different bits of digital information that require different computer operations to make them ‘work.’ It is necessary to store the different elements that make up an electronic record according to the particular storage requirements for each element. Then, in order to retrieve the record, it is necessary to have the computer recall the different components and reassemble them, creating, in effect, a replica of the original record that is, or should be, essentially identical to the original though in fact it is not the ‘same’ item.

An electronic message similar to the paper letter discussed above may contain at least two elements: the name and address component in the computer – a digital ‘letterhead’ in effect; and the message itself. The two components come together when the message is saved or transmitted, but they are not saved in the same place in the computer. In order to reconstitute the message later, both elements need to be preserved and linked together.

Since paper is a reasonably durable medium, it can last a very long time. And little work is required to protect it: as long as it is kept dry and away from fire or water, the document will usually outlast its administrative and legal lifespan, and if properly preserved it can last for hundreds of years. The durability of paper led to the development of the life cycle concept, because it was possible to argue that records could be active and in regular use, then be kept in semi-active storage once they were no longer immediately valuable and then either destroyed as obsolete or kept as archival. This life cycle could take upwards of 30 to 50 years or more to evolve. Paper records could withstand the experience of being stored and essentially ignored until they were needed, no matter how long the wait.

Because an electronic record is made up of discrete bits of data, it cannot be accessed or used without some form of computer technology. There is no ‘original record’ as it is understood in a paper-based environment. The electronic record only exists when the different digital components are brought together in the way they were created in the first place. Therefore, the concept of the life cycle has a very different application in the digital environment. Applying the record life cycle concept in the digital environment requires that records professionals participate actively in the management of the record even before it is created, rather than waiting until it has been created, used and transferred to storage before making appraisal and retention decisions. The management of electronic records also requires the development of strategies and the implementation of technologies that will maintain the digital components so that they may be reassembled in order to replicate the original electronic record.

As a result of changing technologies, the focus of life cycle records management has shifted away from the management of the physical record itself to the creation of record-keeping strategies and processes for the life cycle management of records within an electronic information system. Show Less

  Material Name Type Size Length
UNIT-1: WHAT ARE ELECTRONIC RECORDS? PDF 614.91 KB  
UNIT2: THE TECHNOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK FOR ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT PDF 433.67 KB  
UNIT 3: LEGAL AND ORGANISATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS PDF 305.86 KB  
UNIT 4: THE ROLE OF STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES PDF 528.59 KB  
UNIT 5: THE IMPORTANCE OF METADATA PDF 384.51 KB  
Test Name Pass Questions
Chapter 1 Test 60.00% 21

Records and information management is a core responsibility in any organisation, in the same way that human resources management and financial management are core functions. Records and information management should be recognized as a formal programme within any government or other agency, which means... Show More

Records and information management is a core responsibility in any organisation, in the same way that human resources management and financial management are core functions. Records and information management should be recognized as a formal programme within any government or other agency, which means the organisation needs to provide the organisational and financial support necessary to ensure the effectiveness of the records programme.
Records and information management involves managing records in all formats from their creation to their ultimate disposal. The growing use of computers and the consequent creation of more and more electronic records are putting pressure on governments and other organisations to manage increasingly decentralized record-keeping systems. As a result, many organisations find that it is more and more difficult to locate information when it is required. The end result is, at best, a disjointed approach to office work and, at worst, chaos.

In order to support effective electronic records management, this training module examines issues involved with planning and managing electronic records management programmes.

Unit 1 examines the purpose and scope of electronic records management (ERM) policies and explains the elements that should be included in a strong and sustainable policy.

Unit 2 examines the steps involved in developing a business case, looking at the nature and purpose of a business case and the key steps involved in the actual development of a business case.

Unit 3 considers the different types of surveys that can be executed and the different steps involved in the process of conducting a records survey, as well as the task of carrying out a business process analysis and participating in surveys of information technology resources.

Unit 4 looks at the steps involved in planning any kind of electronic records management project, including defining the aims and objectives of the project, defining the project scope, determining deliverables, identifying project personnel, establishing and maintaining communications, ensuring quality control, preparing project documentation and establishing evaluation procedures.

Unit 5 addresses a number of issues involved with selecting and implementing electronic records management systems, including establishing a project plan, deter¬mining business requirements, understanding functional requirements, choosing an ERM vendor, configuring and implementing the ERMS, monitoring the system, and establishing mechanisms to achieve support for and success with the ERMS system.

Unit 6 considers the role of advocacy in supporting a strong records management programme, analysing the concept of advocacy and the various stages or a project at which records management advocacy can be useful; it also considers two levels of advocacy: macro-level and micro-level, and explains how to clarify the message to be conveyed through advocacy initiatives.

Unit 7 examines two important ways of supporting change in an organisation: communication and training and introduces concepts about the skills and approaches needed for successful change management. Show Less

  Material Name Type Size Length
UNIT 2.1: DEVELOPING RECORDS POLICIES PDF 245.21 KB  
UNIT 2.2: DEVELOPING A BUSINESS CASE FOR IMPROVED ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT PDF 680.75 KB  
UNIT 2.3: CONDUCTING A RECORDS SURVEY PDF 301.22 KB  
UNIT 2.4: PLANNING AN ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT PROJECT PDF 820.70 KB  
UNIT 2.5: SELECTING AND IMPLEMENTING ERM SOFTWARE SYSTEMS PDF 666.39 KB  
unit 2.6: ADVOCATING EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT PDF 325.29 KB  
UNIT 2.7: MANAGING ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE PDF 291.49 KB  
Test Name Pass Questions
Chapter 2 Test 60.00% 31

Just like physical records, electronic records need to be managed consistently. Effective management includes the following tasks:
. Setting up classification structures (to aid in filing records)
. Establishing retention and disposal rules (to determine how long to keep records and how to dispose of... Show More

Just like physical records, electronic records need to be managed consistently. Effective management includes the following tasks:
. Setting up classification structures (to aid in filing records)
. Establishing retention and disposal rules (to determine how long to keep records and how to dispose of them)
. Assigning access permissions or security rights (to clarify who may use records)
. Determining whether a record is official (and so must be managed as part of a formal records management scheme) or transitory (and so should be removed from use as soon as it is no longer needed).

Unlike paper records, however, electronic records may be stored in various formats and on various media. For example, an electronic record may be saved as both a Word document and as a ‘portable document format’ or PDF (a format that allows documents to be saved and exchanged over the Internet without alteration).

The Word document may then be stored in a centralized computer, while the PDF may be transferred to a memory stick or a personal digital assistant (PDA). The same record now exists in two different locations and in two different formats.

Another challenge with managing and using electronic records arises from the way in which they were created. Records created using Instant Messaging (IM), PDAs, Palm Pilots and electronic mail (email) can be difficult to capture and preserve in an electronic record-keeping repository. Unless the PDA, Palm Pilot or Blackberry is synchronized to communicate directly with the office desktop computer, and unless staff are diligent about downloading and transferring their messages from the remote device to the office computer, it can be difficult if not impossible for records managers to access and preserve those records.

Another difficulty with preserving and protecting electronic records is the way in which they are created: electronic mail, for example, can become like a conversation, with several messages building one on top of another. These ‘threads,’ as they are called, can become very long. How does a records manager capture the entire thread, when it includes multiple contributors or when the topic or subject of the original email is modified and a new subject emerges partway through the ‘conversation’?

It is now apparent that policies and procedures are important tools for managing electronic records. But policies need to be enforced and procedures need to be maintained in order to ensure the ongoing protection of records.

Two of the most important procedures that can be taken to preserve and access electronic records is
(1) establishing a strong classification scheme for all paper and electronic records, including electronic mail and
(2) capturing adequate metadata about the records as they are created and used.
This Chapter examines several important issues involved in the management of electronic records in the office.

Unit 3.1 defines the concepts of classification and functional classification and then examines the benefits of developing effective functional classification schemes. It then considers the key steps involved in classification, including identifying different types of files, determining the complexity of the classification scheme and standardising information in the scheme.

Unit 3.2 covers a wide range of issues associated with managing electronic records in the office environment. Topics addressed include the following:
- understanding and applying naming conventions,
- using computer software to standardise the creation and naming of records and files,
- considering different methods for saving electronic documents,
- using different approaches to the collection of metadata (including collecting metadata manually,
- using computer systems to generate metadata,
- using forms to gather metadata and using other methods),
- managing records in shared computer drives, synchronising computers,
- managing electronic mail,
- managing paper and electronic records in a hybrid environment and establishing good housekeeping procedures for electronic records care.

Unit 3.3 examines the nature and importance of appraisal and then outlines five steps involved in carrying out effective appraisal and disposal actions, including: conducting research, determining the value of records, making an appraisal decision (including creating a retention and disposal schedule), implementing the decision and monitoring appraisal decisions.

Unit 3.4 looks at the concept of access and considers the importance of developing sound and effective access policies for electronic and paper records, particularly in the public sector. The unit includes a discussion of the importance of regulating and monitoring access, and it addresses the role and scope of access policies. Show Less

  Material Name Type Size Length
UNIT 3.1: DEVELOPING CLASSIFICATION SCHEMES PDF 357.08 KB  
UNIT 3.2: MANAGING ELECTRONIC RECORDS PDF 660.24 KB  
UNIT 3.3: APPRAISING AND DISPOSING OF ELECTRONIC RECORDS PDF 655.89 KB  
UNIT 3.4: DEVELOPING ACCESS POLICIES IN AN ELECTRONIC ENVIRONMENT PDF 382.82 KB  
Test Name Pass Questions
Chapter 3 Test 60.00% 26

This Chapter is the most technically challenging of the five Chapters in the series.

Not only are the issues involved complex, but the solutions to preserving electronic records over long periods are still emerging.

Please note that this Chapter is not a ‘how-to’ manual but rather an educational... Show More

This Chapter is the most technically challenging of the five Chapters in the series.

Not only are the issues involved complex, but the solutions to preserving electronic records over long periods are still emerging.

Please note that this Chapter is not a ‘how-to’ manual but rather an educational guide, designed to introduce readers to key concepts and ideas and direct them to further sources of information.

This Chapter examines the nature of, and challenges associated with, the preservation of electronic records.

The purpose of archival preservation is to ensure that records remain accessible over time in such a way that they can be considered authentic and reliable evidence.

Not only must records be accessible, but their intrinsic value must also be retained. For traditional manual records and paper-based collections, including textual and audiovisual records created before the advent of computer technologies, the principal obstacle to preservation is the physical decay of the materials themselves.

Paper records can become damaged through excessive handling and as a result of deterioration caused by the acids in the paper fibres, leaving documents brittle and discoloured over time. As well, the colour dyes in photographic films and prints continue to be chemically active and can fade when exposed to excessive light or high temperatures.

The task of preserving electronic records over long periods presents a number of complex challenges.

As discussed in Chapter 1, digital information is stored in the form of bits: ones and zeros that denote values in binary notation. These bits have no inherent meaning; rather, they represent the encoding of information according to a predefined scheme.

Computerized information can only be read with the help of special computer hardware and software capable of translating that information into human-readable form.

A significant challenge for preserving electronic records is the degradation of the software or systems required to make digital information readable. Another difficult problem in preserving electronic records is the inevitable obsolescence of the technology used to create them. For example, some digital photographs are created or saved in a popular computer format called TIFF or ‘tagged image file format.’ In order to view that image, the user needs access to TIFF image viewing software to render the bits into viewable form. That image could then be converted into another file format, such as GIF or ‘graphic interchange format.’ The image the viewer sees will look identical to the TIFF image, but the computer is reading two completely different records, each with its own unique qualities.

Whichever format is chosen, the user needs access to multiple computer technologies: the appropriate image rendering software; the right operating system and hardware configuration to view the image; and the hardware and software required to run the computer in the first place. As well, the user will need a way to connect the computer to the media on which the image is stored, such as a computer’s hard disk drive or a CD-ROM storage device, which might require specialised software to function.

As a result, access to any digital object – photograph, document, database, spreadsheet or other electronic information resource – depends upon a complex network of interconnected technologies. This network is called a ‘representation network’ since it must comprise all of the elements required to represent the object correctly. The absence or failure of any part of this network could render the object inaccessible.

One of the difficulties in securing a suitable representation network is that computer technologies are constantly changing and evolving. Information technology is a rapidly advancing field, and new and improved technologies are being developed regularly. Equally, economic pressures force technology developers to follow a regular cycle of product replacement. New products and new versions of existing products are brought to market regularly, and as new products become available, existing products cease to be supported.
The currency of any given computer technology is, therefore, typically very short: perhaps five to ten years at most. This rapid rate of obsolescence applies to all technologies in the representation network, including file formats, software, operating systems and hardware.

The challenge of digital preservation, therefore, lies in maintaining a way to access digital objects in the face of rapid technological obsolescence. In particular, digital preservation requires methods for identifying and predicting the impact of technological change on digital collections and for executing appropriate preservation strategies to reduce this impact, often even before the records themselves have been created.

Maintaining accessibility in itself is not enough – in an archival context, the authenticity of the record must also be preserved.

As discussed in Chapter 1, the authenticity of an electronic record derives from three essential characteristics: reliability, integrity and usability. But authenticity in a digital environment is complicated by the fact that the preservation of electronic records always entails some form of transformation.

Digital preservation requires the management of objects over time, and the techniques used may result in frequent and profound changes to the technical representation of that record. Over time, new technical manifestations of a record will be created, making it that much more important to confirm the authenticity of the record.

Therefore, ensuring the preservation of and access to electronic records involves understanding some of the important technological and management issues associated with digital preservation.

Digital preservation represents a formidable challenge, at both a technical and organisational level, and many challenges remain to be fully resolved. However, these difficulties should not be seen as obstacles to the establishment of practical preservation policies.

Every element of the preservation process described in this Chapter can be addressed with varying degrees of complexity as suits the resources available.
Furthermore, the widespread and active research activities in this field should be grounds for optimism – more mature and integrated solutions should become widely available in the next few years. But the rapid pace of research should not be seen as a reason to postpone action now. Even electronic records created relatively recently can be under threat, and the adoption of some simple preservation and security measures can significantly reduce these risks immediately.

This Chapter provides an overview of the issues involved with preserving electronic records over time and examines some of the options for establishing a preservation strategy.

The discussion focuses on preserving digital objects since, as discussed in Chapter 1, the preservation of a complex electronic record may well involve ensuring the protection of many different components or objects.

Unit 4.1 examines important principles associated with the task of digital preservation, including considering the characteristics of digital objects; understanding the role of different characterization software programs, and addressing different types of preservation, including refreshing data, replicating data, migration and emulation. The unit includes a brief overview of issues consider when choosing the best preservation strategy.

Unit 4.2 introduces different preservation practices, including developing a preservation policy, preparing a risk assessment, establishing security and access controls, ensuring the integrity of the electronic record, managing metadata, managing the content of electronic records and planning for emergencies.

Unit 4.3 examines the role, purpose and nature of a digital repository. Specific topics covered include the concept of a trusted digital repository, requirements for establishing and maintaining a trusted digital repository, selecting hardware and software solutions, understanding the ingest process and the concept of information packages, choosing storage devices, preparing records for preservation in the repository, ingesting records into the repository, deciding when to destroy original records, monitoring the status of the preservation programme and staying current with technological changes.

Unit 4.4 introduces information about various research projects currently underway around the world on the subject of electronic records management and offers comments on possible future directions and trends in electronic records preservation. Show Less

  Material Name Type Size Length
UNIT 4: UNDERSTANDING KEY CONCEPTS IN DIGITAL PRESERVATION PDF 357.08 KB  
UNIT 4.2: BASIC DIGITAL PRESERVATION PRACTICES PDF 381.35 KB  
PRESERVING ELECTRONIC RECORDS IN A TRUSTED DIGITAL REPOSITORY PDF 512.26 KB  
UNIT 4.4: CURRENT RESEARCH AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS PDF 294.59 KB  
Test Name Pass Questions
Chapter 4 Test 60.00% 34

Course Reviews

Solomon Kaminda

Information Architect:
I have a wealth of experience in information management and architecture in the following areas:
Database Management - Data quality management, Data Warehousing, Harvesting, etc.
Enterprise Content Management: CMS, ERMS, EDRMS and DMS
Records Management: Policy Formulation for both Manual and Electronic Records Management Policies, Establishing Records Management Programs, Records Life Cycle Management, Records Management Applications, Records Keeping Standards, etc
Archiving: Procedures, setting up/ Initiating archival programs, digital archiving (digitization and microfilming projects), Storage and retrieval

Goals: To enable organizations to tap into information as the No.1 Management resource by empowering them with the right information and systems.

Specialties:Information systems implementation, systems use training, Archiving, ECM training, e-records systems evaluation, Records Management Standards, digitization, microfilming.

Trainer of Trainers
Human Resource Institute, Kenya
March 2012 – Present (1 year 4 months)Nairobi

I do training of those who carry out or are in charge of training function in their organisations. The course is called Certified Professional Training course.

Lecturer- Part Time
Institute of Advanced Technology
January 2010 – Present (3 years 6 months)

Teaching the following to BBIT Degree students and BICTM students for St Pauls University & Maseno University respectively.
1. Data Structures & Algorithms
2. Systems Engineering
3. Data Communication
4. Systems Analysis & Design
5. Structured Programming Models

Information Architect- Training Designer
Kenvision Techniks Institute
August 2009 – Present (3 years 11 months)

My responsibilities as a Training Designer includes

• Develop the staff training and development policy for the company
• Conduct client staff training needs assessment;
• Facilitate consultations with client training managers on priority specialized training requirements for their organizations.
• Prepare annual training plans and present to the Training Advisory Committee for approval;
• Design, develop, test training materials and implementation of in-house competency based training and development programmes relevant to specific needs of different clients
• Prepare handbook and facilitate implementation for induction programs for all new staff;
• Facilitate the continuous professional development of staff and prepare annual returns for management records;
• Prepare annual program for priority conferences and facilitate staff participation;
• Carry out post training performance evaluation and assess the impact of training on staff performance;
• Provide career-counseling services to staff;
• Update and maintain the skills inventory database for Kenvision Techniks;
• Perform any other duties assigned by management

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